About

My name is Jeri, and I am a traveler, photographer, wedding officiant, writer, mother and friend.

The name for this blog — Anything is Possible Travel — was inspired by Carrieanna Hess, who not only believes that anything IS possible, but also that “if you haven’t tried, you don’t know if you can do it.”

Carrieanna is my daughter, frequent traveling companion, and constant supporter.  You will see her often on this blog!

23 thoughts on “About

  1. Hi Jeri, I have taken the liberty to add your very nice RSS feeds to my “digital newspaper” about accessible tourism.
    You can see it here: http://paper.li/f-1315995457
    The paper comes out ( i.e. gets refreshed) on Mondays at 12:00 noon (GMT). There are not many subscribers yet – and in fact subscribing is made more difficult by the “captcha” system.
    Otherwise we are always busy at http://www.accessibletourism.org and facebook.com/accessibletourism (over 500 followers) and Linked in Group: http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=4003674&trk=hb_side_g
    Please join LinkedIn group too…

    ENAT works mainly with businesses, whereas your focus is more on getting info to the consumers who need it, I would say. You are doing a good job!
    I hope our efforts can complement yours nicely.

    With best regards,
    Ivor Ambrose
    Managing Director, ENAT.

    European Network for Accessible Tourism
    ENAT is a Non-Profit Association registered in Belgium.

    • Thank you SO much, Ivor! I have joined the ENAT LinkedIn group and Facebook page, signed up for the newsletter, and I will add your page to my blogroll.

      And thank you for your very kind words. Yes, my goal is to encourage travelers, and I am very grateful for groups like yours who share the information and tools needed for accessibility. There is so much to learn and enjoy through travel!

      Wishing you all the best, and may our efforts be very successful!

      Warmly,
      Jeri Murphy

  2. Hi would you mind letting me know which hosting company
    you’re working with? I’ve loaded your blog in 3 completely different browsers and I must say this blog loads a lot faster then most.
    Can you suggest a good internet hosting provider at a reasonable price?
    Many thanks, I appreciate it!

    • Hello, Mavis.
      Thank you for your positive comments. My blog is powered by WordPress.
      As for an internet hosting provider, mine is through my phone company, AT&T. I am sure there are other, better and faster providers, though. I would suggest doing a google search, and then checking any reviews that might be posted about the service.
      Best of luck!
      Jeri

    • Hello, Mavis. I just switched my blog to WordPress.org, and Bluehost is my new hosting company. I’d be interested to know if you still find it easy to load and navigate.

      Warmly,
      Jeri

  3. Hi Jeri,

    My name is Rob Braun with AWExperience.org. We specialize in adaptive wilderness adventures. Have a look at AWExperience.org/support, See what you think of what we want to accomplish, if you have questions, and if you’ld be willing to help us promote the campaign to make the video series a start. I’d love to share the vision we have with you. Our fb site is at facebook.com/adaptivewilderenessexperience

  4. Jeri,
    First, Kudos to your daughter for her courageous story. I am a diabetic leg amputee, and, ironically, a travel agent. My niche HAD BEEN group cruises PRIOR to my surgery. But the life I have had just getting around in the U.S.A. since my surgery has rerouted my brain to a new niche. ACCESSIBLE TRAVEL. I’ve recently bought the domain, accessibletravel.biz, and am building a wordpress blog site which i hope to unleash on the world by next week. I would like to include a Skype interview with Carrieanna, and wanted to leave you my contact info so that you 2 could call me to discuss it without divulging your private info online. Please call me at your convenience at 804-221-6288. Thank you for your time, consideration, and dedication to the advancement of ACCESSIBLE TRAVEL ALL OVER THE WORLD

    • Thank you for your comment, Timothy, and for your dedication to turn your personal challenges into an avenue to encourage and assist others. I have forwarded your contact information to Carrieanna, and hope that she will be able to assist you in your blog goals.

      I look forward to seeing your site once launched, and hope that our connection will be of benefit to each other and to our readers.

      Best,
      Jeri Murphy

  5. Hi my name is Anthony Driscoll and I’m looking to gain some support on a project I am developing that provides an accessible travel guide to wheelchair users. I’m giving away a free download to the first 100 people to sign up at http://www.wheelyapp.com . I’ve also launched a crowd funding campaign where I am looking for funds to help with the very expensive cost of development. You can find that link here:

    http://www.crowdrise.com/wheelynyc/fundraiser/anthonydriscoll

    In New York City alone there are over 500,00 people with ambulatory difficulties. Thats not including caretakers or tourists visiting in a chair everyday.

    Wheely is an application designed to help wheelchair users better navigate the New York City Subway system as well as provide a useful guide to accessible places in specific neighborhoods. Wheely features accessible subway maps licensed by the MTA®, specific directions and maps to subway elevators and reviews based on local accessible places. Wheely is founded by myself, Anthony Driscoll, a Parsons New School MFA Design and Technology candidate. I was inspired to create this app through travels with my father who is diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. I hope to establish more support of his app through various disability focused organizations. More information can be found at http://www.wheelyapp.com

    Finding subway elevators are tough. Especially if you are not familiar with the city. Sometimes the elevators could be around the corner, up the street, or inside another building. At Wheely we have manually plotted each and every elevator’s GPS coordinates so we are able to provide users with exact directions to those elevators. Wheely is also fully licensed by the MTA® and have received privileged information and neighborhood maps. We have taken those maps and plotted out each station’s elevator locations on both the street level as well as indoors.

    Thank you so much for your time and I look forward to hearing from you!

    Anthony Driscoll

    • What a great idea, Anthony! Thank you for sharing; I hope others will find the information useful in their travels!

      Warmest regards,
      Jeri

  6. Thank you so much for this blog. I have MS and am still fairly good at walking but have been using a cane for when I am in court, church, work or other areas where I don’t want to fall. My two teen sons and I are travelling to Monterey and Hearst Castle next month in CA and I have been looking at using my mobility scooter for some of the excursions like the Monterey Aquarium and getting around town. Before MS, I travelled and lived in Europe and have taken my kids with me all over the place. I don’t want to limit my travel because of this and I really enjoyed reading about how you are handling things. Thank you for putting this information out there!

    • Thank you for your kind comments, Laurie! I’m glad to know this blog is helpful and encouraging, as that’s my main objective.
      I hope you love Monterey and the California coast. The weather should be lovely and cool enough to keep your body comfortable. Of course, if you have the time and interest, I would encourage you to visit Point Lobos State Natural Reserve. (It’s just south of Monterey and Carmel.) There are three accessible trails there, the views are wonderful, and if Carrieanna is available I am sure she would love to give you a tour.
      Safe and happy travels!
      Jeri

  7. Hi Jeri,
    I had sent you the post above about travelling last summer on the CA coast. We had a great time but two things I will mention – one is at the Mystery Spot up near Santa Cruz, my mobility scooter went haywire! My brother was able to use it to push me up to the “haunted” house but it was pretty wild. We also went to Hearst Castle and I let them know ahead of time that I was using my scooter. We ended up with a private bus to the castle where we were met by a guide with a golf cart of sorts to take us around the castle on a private tour. Very nice!
    We just came back from Washington DC where I flew with the scooter for the first time. DC is pretty good for the scooter crowd and it allowed me to see everything. Even the moonlight monument tour we booked could accommodate the scooter on the bus. We also went to New York City where the sidewalks were not as accommodating and there is not always a ramp at the lights. Still was worth it to see the 9-11 memorial museum, etc. I see one of the other posts above mentions trying to find a subway elevator. I can tell you I saw many stations but nowhere was there an elevator. We did find it at the PATH station at the new WTC and also in Newark where we parked. Since I come from NJ originally, I will check his website out before our next trip back home.
    Thank you again for the encouragement on this site to continue to travel. I know I could not have done this trip without the scooter and it is wonderful to see so many people willing to accommodate.

    • Thank you for your very informative comment and for your kind words, Laurie.
      I am glad you are able to travel so much, and I appreciate the tips you’ve shared.
      I hope this blog will continue to encourage others to get out and see their world.
      ~ Jeri

  8. Hi Jeri! Wonderful blog 🙂 Thank you for sharing your experiences! I’ve written a Paris accessible trip planning guide, and was wondering if you’d be interested in reviewing it. Please feel free to get in touch if you are!

    • Hello, Paula.

      Thank you for your kind words!

      And yes, I would love to see what you’ve written about accessibility in Paris – one of my favorite cities! If you would send it to me by email that would be great: Anything.Is.Possible.Travel@gmail.com

      I look forward to reading it!

      Warmly,
      Jeri

  9. Have you traveled to the Netherlands? I’m a volunteer and a guide for Accessible Travel Netherlands. Our goal is to provide information about accessible travel in Amsterdam and surrounding cities. Many people are unaware of how accessible the Netherlands is. We can plan trips for people, arrange hotels, rent adaptable bikes, arrange for accessible taxis, and do all the detail work so people can have a fun vacation and not have to worry about what is accessible and what is not. If you are ever in the Amsterdam area, we would love to work with you and show you how accessible the city is. Our main website is http://www.accessibletravelnl.com. We are also holding a conference in March on accessible travel. You can check it out at this website: http://www.accessibletravelnl.com/projects/ACCESSTOUR-Project.

  10. We just went on a fabulous trip to Ecuador and the Galapogos Islands. I have spinal stenosis and marked leg weakness. I can walk short distances with forearm crutches but need assistance for longer distances or rough terrain. We worked with Accessible Journeys, a travel agent in Pennsylvania (www.accessiblejourneys.com). They in turn contracted with South America for All (www.southamericaforall.com) based in Ecuador. The trip was great. They had specially designed wheelchairs for rough terrain and special techniques for getting me in and out of the water. The acomidations were all accessible. They specialize in clients who are totally wheelchair bound.

    If Galapagos is on your bucket list contact these folks.

    • Hello, Mr. Bumroong.

      Thank you for your inquiry. While we have no immediate plans to travel to Thailand, we appreciate your comment and have “liked” your Facebook page so we can stay informed about your services.

      Keep up the good work!

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